Western General Store Home Decor

Table Lamps

This is my first time making table lamps and it’s so easy that I had ideas for about 10 western style lamps. I made three to give you inspiration to create your own. You can purchase the lamp parts at home improvement or hardware stores and they’re easy to assemble.

In my husband’s shop was this unique looking Padauk wood and I decided to use it for my first lamp. We cut this piece in half on the table saw and routed out each half for the shaft of the lamp. We glued and clamped the halves together.

I had 4 cast iron spurs that have little slits which made it ideal for screwing them to the post.

I was hoping the bottom spurs would support the lamp, but I decided to add a wooden base. This wood is beautiful!

On the bottom side of the base we drilled holes and routed out a place for the cord.

I sprayed the wood and spurs with polyurethane and later added a paste wax to the wood. Then I glued pieces of tooled leather and painted the screws to match the spurs.

I stapled the cord to keep it secure and added peel and stick felt to the bottom.

Here it is with our medium Lamp Shade with a glass star. I found the star finial at the home improvement store. The wooden part of this lamp is 15 1/2″ tall.

The second lamp is made from mahogany and I used our Mahogany Star.

My husband mortised holes into a mahogany base for the posts.

We drilled holes in the star and posts and made pegs from wooden skewers. The star was attached with glue.

When the top piece was screwed on, a hole was drilled in the top for the lamp parts and the back for the cord.

My idea was to staple the cord to the back so it would be hidden, eliminating the need for a metal post down the middle. I applied several coats of polyurethane which gave the wood a rich tone.

The wooden part of this lamp is 14 1/2″ tall.

For the third lamp, I glued and nailed pieces of weathered pallet wood.

Before we added the base, we ran a string through the top hole and out the back so we could easily install the cord.

I loved the way this wood looked and hated to add anything to it. With this blank canvas, the possibilities are endless.

I sprayed vinegar on the Steer Star Plaque to ‘rustic’ it and used brown screws to attach it. I robbed this shade from another lamp I had.

Here it is with the medium star lamp shade. The pallet wood base is 13 1/2″ tall.

I hope you have as much fun as I did when you make your lamps. What ideas do you have?

 

Western Style Mirrors

I’ve always wanted to make western style mirrors. I bought a couple of mirrors from the craft store, one 12″x12″ and the other 10″ round. I used the weathered wood frame from the Clocks blog. Since I used epoxy to ‘glue’ in the tile, it took a while to get it out and clean it up. I had to rout out a little wider for the mirror since it was larger. I cut strips of leather 1″ wide and attached with Star Tacks. My husband’s industrial strength glue gun worked nicely for mounting the mirror in the frame. A different idea would be to attach hair on cowhide pieces to the corners with upholstery nails and add barbed wire on the sides.

Now for a lariat mirror. I took a lariat and wound it tight to fit around the 10″ mirror. I first taped it together  so I could wrap leather lace on each side. Then I attached leather laced conchos. I cut a piece of plywood on the scroll saw a little smaller than the lariat and glued the mirror onto it. I set the lariat on the mirror and pulled parts of the lariat down around the plywood and attached with a brad nail gun.

I thought I would add the Texas Coat Rack to this list of western style mirrors.

These are relatively easy western mirror projects you can make for gifts or home décor.

 

Horseshoe Cup Holder

This project is a Horseshoe Cup Holder made with wood and Tiny Horseshoes. I drew a design for the feet and cut it on the scroll saw.

I glued them onto a wood post and painted it a rustic gray. I screwed on the horseshoes including one on top.

You could add more horseshoes and spray paint it your desired color for a jewelry stand.

Clocks

It’s ‘time’ to make clocks! You can make a clock out of just about anything. It’s easy and fun!

We have some left over Saltillo tile we used from a house project and I wanted to make something with one of the tiles. I put together a barn wood frame and routed out a place on the front of the frame for the tile.

Epoxy was used to hold the tile in place.

Since the frame is square (17.5″ x 17.5″), I decided to rotate it to make a diamond clock. Holes were drilled for the 2″ Square Berry Copper Conchos, 3/4″ Copper Clavos and the clock hands. You can get the clocks and hands at the craft store. Concho screw adapters were used for the conchos or you could glue them.

This boot was a previous project transformed into a clock. I attached the clock hands and small brown conchos for the numbers.

This is also a previous project transformed into a clock, using the Mini Star Nails and Tiny Horseshoes for the numbers.

This is a mahogany star I had made for another project but I thought it would make a cute clock. Tiny Star Tacks were used for the numbers.

I needed ample room on the clock post for the thick Small Star and I had a thin piece of basswood for wood burning projects. I place the star and XL Horseshoe, built the clock and marked the holes for the horseshoe nails. I used Horseshoe Star Conchos for the 12, 3, 6 and 9 and Star Tacks for the rest of the numbers. I marked and drilled the holes.

Then I removed it all and put a coat of dark brown Briwax on the wood. All the nails were too long so I cut them shorter. The frame’s depth is 1 1/2″ to accommodate the clock in the back. This clock can sit on a shelf.

I rummaged through the pallet scraps and picked a few to make a round lariat clock. I attached 2 boards with dry wall screws to the back to hold it together.

I drilled holes to attach the lariat rope with jute twine and for the clock and Bronc and Berry Conchos.

A concho screw adapter was used for the conchos.

Bronc and Berry Concho

What clocks have you made? Tell us about them.

Horseshoe Wreath

I have always wanted to make a horseshoe wreath, but since I’m not a welder, I created a new way to make it.

I used #6 x 3/4″ pan head machine screws and nuts. I did enlarge a few holes on the drill press so the screws would fit.

These are large cast iron horseshoes. You could use steel horseshoes as well.

Getting the right screw is crucial and these fit perfectly.

I was so exited, I immediately wrapped red bandanas through the horseshoes.

I sprayed the horseshoes silver metallic and wove a pink bandana through the horseshoes, a blue one next to it and tied it in the back.

You’ve got to love this cowboy version! I sprayed one of our Western Cutouts silver and attached it with wire. I wrapped blue and red bandanas and tied them in the front.

Star Horseshoe Wreath with a star burlap ribbon, Mini Star Nails painted red and a painted Star in Circle Cutout hung by wire.

Texas Horseshoe Wreath with Texas in Circle Cutout, blue and red bandanas, and Texas Barbed Wire Conchos. I added concho screw adapters to the conchos and screwed them into the holes. I painted the cutout to resemble the Texas flag.

This is with a plain burlap ribbon woven through the horseshoes and tied into a bow at the bottom. Looks like decoration for a wedding.

The possibilities are endless and these ideas will give you inspiration to create your own. It’s fun and easy!

Clavos

I would like to show you the many different uses for our Clavos. Clavos are decorative nails that can be used to accentuate furniture, rustic wood doors, wooden gates, picture frames, chests, countertop edge, wooden crosses, shelf edges and other crafts.

You will need to drill a pilot hole and use a rubber mallet, except for some softer woods. If you have any questions about using clavos, comment below or use the ‘Contact Us’ form.

Here is an example of a wooden cross adorned with black clavos in 2 sizes.

I made another wooden chest out of 1×4 pine boards and added 30 silver clavos and medium star nail.

Barn wood picture frame with copper clavos.

Black clavos on cabinet doors give a nice accent.

Here are a few other uses for clavos I found on the web like these rustic sliding doors. source

Buffet – source

Clavos look nice on this leather covered chair. source

I’m sure you can think of many other uses for versatile clavos.

Clavos used:

Clavos 3/4″

Clavos 1 1/8″

Wooden Storage Chest

I wanted to build a storage chest for our bathroom so I drew a plan in my design program. It would sit by the toilet and hold extra toilet paper with magazines or books on top.

I had rough cedar lap and gap siding left over from house repairs and I cut a board of the 3/4″ thick siding into 10″ pieces to form the sides of the chest.

The board was cupped so we ripped them down the v groove on the table saw.

I glued and nailed the pieces together to form the 4 sides.

I glued and nailed the sides to a solid mahogany base of 12″ x 7 1/2″ and glued and nailed the corners. I cut pieces from scraps and glued them into the gaps at the bottom.

At this stage it looks like a planter. Overall it is 13 1/2″ x 9″ x 10″ tall.

I glued and nailed pieces together on 1/4″ plywood to form the lid. Notice I stained the cut corners on the chest which matches the rest of the wood.

I glued cedar trim on the lid and clamped it with this nifty framing clamp from Rockler. The finished lid is 14 3/4″ x 10 1/4″.

I could trim the whole chest out in cedar or leather with tacks, but I wanted it to be different.

With a brad nail gun, I nailed rope all the way around the chest, making loops as I went. I sprayed a coat of sealer inside and out.

The final step is to install the hinges.

This wasn’t easy. I was going to put the hinges on the outside of the chest and underneath the lid, but the hinges were too deep and stuck out from the lid. Instead of going to the hardware store to find smaller hinges, I decided to install them on the inside of the chest, but I had to notch out a recess for the hinges so the lid would close without a gap.

The finished project is 13 1/2″ x 9″ x 11″ tall.

Of course, you can store anything in it but this chest holds 6 regular rolls or 4 mega rolls of extra toilet paper in a handy place. It also holds magazines or books on top for the “reading room”.

Our bathroom is nautical themed but you can decorate this chest to your liking. Have fun!

 

Springtime Crafts

Spring is just around the corner so time to bring out the colors of spring.

It’s easy to make a Spring Hat Wreath. I had this sun hat and found a flower garland at the craft store to wrap around it. I wired on a burlap bow and a twine hanger for the top.

Make a horseshoe candle holder by screwing Small Horseshoes onto a block of wood, paint it the colors of spring and add silk or real flowers. Use as centerpieces for weddings or parties. It will hold a 3″ pillar candle or…

A votive.

To make a rustic spring planter I gathered scraps from my weathered pallet wood projects.

I glued and nailed the upright pieces to a pallet wood base.

I used the rest of the flower garland and tied twine around the  planter.

Or you could add daisies and a distressed Cross Nail.

Here is another color scheme with a Mini Star Nail.

These ideas should give you inspiration to create for Springtime.

Hearts

Hearts are the theme today to spread some love around the world!

I made these two lariat hearts by simply using a 44″ piece of lariat, pulling it into the shape of a heart and wrapping with red leather lace, leaving enough excess for a tassel.

I could stop right there. You can hang these anywhere and I thought they looked great! But I wanted to make more hearts!

So, I made a heart from pallet boards. I cut a heart shape from plywood, placed the boards together, traced the heart shape on the boards and cut them on the scroll saw, then glued them to the plywood. Actually, I used liquid nails which I don’t recommend because it takes too long to dry. This heart is 8″ wide x 7″ tall.

Then I cut 2 small hearts from the scraps. They are 3 1/2″ wide x 3″ tall.

I attached a green lariat to the large heart with a brad nail gun and tied the lariat hearts together with red bows. I glued on the small hearts and added a red bandana. When I throw things together like this it gives me inspiration for more ideas.

I painted one board red using a dry brush painting technique.

I found a pink lariat and attached it to the large heart with a brad nail gun then glued on a lariat heart. This was not planned and it fit perfectly.

I cut different shapes from plywood, drilled a hole in each and painted them. I attached these pieces to the lariat with twine.

And here is the finished Valentine’s Lariat Wreath!

I made heart hangers from the small pallet hearts by drilling a hole and adding leather lace. Glue on a concho for western flair.

So this is my twist on a few rustic hearts to give you some inspiration. Hope you enjoyed it!

 

 

 

Horseshoe Towel Holder

This project evolved over time as I came up with ideas. Sometimes I pick up a horseshoe and ideas start popping into my head.

My husband has a wood shop so we have tons of wood. I grabbed a board and screwed a Large Horseshoe on each side and put a couple of finger towels on it. Cute! But…that wasn’t quite what I wanted.

How about a napkin holder? You don’t need to be a welder to make this! I cut a piece of mahogany to 6 5/8″ long  x 2 3/8″ wide x 1″ thick and screwed Large Horseshoes to it after they were spray painted black. You can use any wood and color schemes.

Standard napkins fit perfectly!

Then I decided to make a no weld hand towel stand. I took the base from a previous project (Longhorn Jewelry Holder) which is 6″ x 6″ x 3/4″ thick. The mahogany post is 1 3/4″ x 1″ x 16″ tall.

The Medium Star, 2 Large Horseshoes, and a Small Star Nail for the top were spray painted black. Try other types of wood and color schemes.

I drilled a hole in the end of the post, placed the star and post on the base and screwed it together, using a washer. The horseshoes were screwed to the post and a hole drilled for the star nail on top.

The wood was sprayed with a clear protective finish.

I love it! It is very sturdy to hold hand towels.

Here’s an idea! Attach an XL Horseshoe to the bottom of your favorite framed picture.

Or you can cut 2 pieces of wood and attach an XL Horseshoe with screws. Drill a key hole in the back of each piece and hang on screws that have drilled into the wall. I spray painted it black but you can use any colors to match your decor.

Wooden disposable guest towel holder. This is relatively easy and looks great for equine or western decor.

The base is 3/8″ thick x 8 1/2″ long x 4 3/4″ wide. The side pieces are 1/2″ thick x 2 1/2″ tall. I drew a design around a Tiny Horseshoe and cut it out on the scroll saw. Glue the sides on, clamp and let dry. There are a couple of brad nails in each side. The mahogany was finished with dark brown Briwax. The Tiny Horseshoes were screwed to the sides.

I think this towel holder is my favorite. These are a few of the many great horseshoe ideas to incorporate into your home decor. See what you can dream up!

Western & Rustic Decor ~ Texas Gifts ~ Designer Supplies